Saturday, April 12, 2014

Almira Simmerman Ely

Almira Simmerman Ely Birth: Jan. 30, 1840 West Jersey Stark County Illinois, USA Death: May 26, 1908 Union City Randolph County Indiana, USA Almira SIMMERMAN. She Married William H. ELY on 10 Jun 1858 in Stark Co. IL. Burial: Union City Cemetery Union City Randolph County Indiana, USA Created by: David Kennedy Record added: Feb 22, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 85387798

William Henry Ely

William H. Ely Birth: Jul. 26, 1838 Death: Mar. 12, 1903 Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamiltion Counties,Iowa The Lewis Publishing Company, 113 Adams Street, Chicago 1888 William Ely, proprietor of Ely's livery stable, on Second street, near the Willson House, is a native of Wayne County, New York, where he lived until he was sixteen years of age, when he went to Stark County, Illinois. In 1862 he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Infantry, and served three years. He participated in the battles at Kirksville, Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, siege of Atlanta, Snake Creek Gap, Columbia, Franklin, Fort Fisher, Nashville, and Kingston. He was wounded twice, once by a minnie ball, and once receiving a saber wound in his wrist. After his discharge he returned to Illinois, and in 1865 came to Iowa and engaged in farming until 1875, when embarked in the livery business in Webster City. He keeps a full line of carriage and road horses, and vehicles of all kinds, and his genial manners, and liberal, honorable dealing, have won the respect of his customers. In politics Mr. Ely is a Republican. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 Name: William H. Ely Side: Union Regiment State/Origin: Illinois Regiment Name: 112 Illinois Infantry. Regiment Name Expanded: 112th Regiment, Illinois Infantry Company: F Rank In: Private Rank In Expanded: Private Rank Out: Sergeant Rank Out Expanded: Sergeant Film Number: M539 roll 26 American Civil War Soldiers Name: William Ely Residence: West Jersey, Illinois Enlistment Date: 15 Aug 1862 Side Served: Union State Served: Illinois Service Record: Promoted to Full Sergeant. Enlisted as a Private on 15 August 1862. Enlisted in Company F, 112th Infantry Regiment Illinois on 20 Sep 1862. Mustered Out Company F, 112th Infantry Regiment Illinois on 20 Jun 1865 at Greensboro, NC. United States, National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, 1866-1938 Name: William H Ely State: Illinois County: Vermillion City: Danville Branch: Danville Branch Military History Time and Place of Each Enlistment: Aug 15, 1862, Toulon, IL Rank: Pvt Company and Regiement: F; 112 Ill Inf. Time and Place of Discharge: June 20, 1865, Chicago, Ill Cause of Discharge: Close of War Kind and Decree of Disability: G.S.W.C legs; Saber H. Forearm When and Where Contracted: Winter 1862, Lexington, Ky Domestic History Where Born: New York Age: 61 Height: 5 9 Complexion: Dk Color of Eyes: Gray Color of Hair: Gray Read and Write: Yes Religion: Prot. Occupation: Agent Residence Subsequent to Discharge: Union Ciyt, Ind. Married or Single: Married Name and Address of Nearest Relative: Almira Ely (wife); Union City, Ind. Home HIstory Rate of Pension: $6.00 Inc. $8.00 Date of Admission and Re-admision: Adm D.B. Jany 26, 1900 Date of Death: A.W.L. April 12, 1903; Union City, Ind. Cause of Death: unknown Burial: Union City Cemetery Union City Randolph County Indiana, USA Created by: David Kennedy Record added: Feb 22, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 85387 William H. Ely Added by: David Kennedy

Alvie Ely "Henry"

William Henry Ely's son. Alvie (Alfred/Albert) ELY/HENRY S_Kiger added this on 22 Jun 2013 Alva/Alvie also used the name Alfred & Albert. He was married a few times. He (Alvie ELY) first married May E. Pitcher Dearing 3 Sep 1889 in Macomb Co. MI. He (Alfred HENRY) then married Flora POWELL 5 Nov 1900 in Randolph Co. IN. And by the time of the 1920 US census, he was married to a woman named "Cora". He had at least 4 children: Adine E.; Phillip A.; Albert G.; and Ruth E.

Almera Johnson Barton, Plural wife of Prophet Joseph Smith

• Almera Woodard Johnson Barton, of Westford, Vermont, became a plural wife of the Prophet Joseph Smith in Nauvoo, Illinois on the 1st of Aug. 1843. • She was highly regarded by the Mormons for her appearance, character and capability; yet before a year had elapsed from the date of her marriage, Almera had become a sorrowing widow and without issue, for the martyrdom of the Prophet occurred the following June 27, 1844. • Born in Vermont, Almera with her parents and other members of the family, had long resided in Pomphret, Chautauqua Co., New York. She was the seventh child and fourth daughter of Julia Hills and Ezekiel Johnson, and was born in October of 1812. Her marriage to the Prophet transpired near her 31st birthday. • On November 16, 1845, at Nauvoo, approximately one and one-half years after the Prophet’s death, she was persuaded to lay aside her widow’s weeds and become the wife of James Reuben Barton. Barton’s letters, written to Almera, with their excellent penmanship, word dexterity and flawless spelling, indicates the writer to be an individual of considerable skill and attainment. Five children, all daughters, were born to Almera and J. Reuben, yet upon Almera’s passing she was devoid of posterity. One by one, her children had been called back to the spirit world, unmarried and childless, leaving her grief-stricken and hope shattered. J. Reuben Barton’s belief and faith were apparently of but a superficial nature, for he eventually became an apostate, causing a rift that slowly widened, until a separation between himself and Almera became inevitable • Almera was not only a homemaker of ability and an individual of taste and attraction, but like all her parent’s children, her fingers dripped service. To her nieces and nephews she was the adored “Aunt Mera,” and showing his high regard for her, her brother, William Derby Johnson, addressed her in his letters as, “My Ever Dear and Respected Sister Almera,” and expressed a hope that when called to the other side, he might be as well-prepared for departure to a higher sphere as she was. • William Derby’s wife, Jane Cadwallader Johnson, also wrote from Colonia Diaz, where the couple moved, making their home later in life and building themselves a handsome dwelling, urging Almera to join them. They wished to look after her in her declining years, she said, and provide the comforts they felt she so deserved and needed. They had everything, Jane declared, to make her comfortable and happy. Yet, although Almera’s resources were at a low ebb, and she was troubled greatly with rheumatism, her independent nature would not permit her to be a burden to anyone. • Death found both herself and William Derby in the selfsame year, with but a month separating them. The summons from the other side came to both in the spring of 1896, while Almera was in Utah, and William Derby in Mexico. William was the younger of the two by twelve years. Almera lived to be eighty-four.

Ruben Barton

Ruben Barton http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/5660/bartor91.htm. Historical Society of Pottawattamie County, Iowa. THE 1891 BIOGRAPHY OF Reuben BARTON. Reuben BARTON, of Weston, Pottawattamie County, is a native of Plainfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, the son of Nathan and Sarah (BURROUGHS) BARTON, and was born January 9, 1812. His parents were natives of the same State, where they were married, and reared a family of thirteen children. In 1823 they removed to Phelps, Ontario County, New York. The same year the father died, and the mother with the unmarried portion of the family, nine in number, returned to Massachusetts, where they remained until 1832, when the subject of this narrative, at the age of twenty years, decided to again go West, and this time to Ohio, where the family, consisting of the mother and four children, arrived November 21, 1832, and settled in the town of Huntsburg, Geauga County. There, in the spring of 1833, Reuben purchased fifty acres of wild land, heavy timber, at $2.50 per acre, paying $30 down. Our subject went to work with a will to prepare a home for himself and mother and a young sister, which he did by hard and incessant toil, chopping and piling the immense growth of timber in heaps, and burning it up! (What a treasure would our Iowa farmers esteem a few acres of such timber!) Here he remained, improving and cultivating the soil for about three years, when his mother accepted an offer of marriage from Mr. Jacob WARRENER, with whom she lived until her death, which occurred in 1853.. After the marriage of his mother Mr. BARTON made his home with a brother-in-law, N. M. FAUN, for about two years, when, in September, 1837, in company with the brother-in-law, he removed to Coles County, Illinois, then mostly in a state of nature. Here he entered 120 acres of Government land, consisting mostly of prairie, with a good supply of timber, and again erected a log cabin and commenced his favorite occupation of farming, while yet in single blessedness, until February 11, 1838, when he was joined in wedlock to Marcia E. WILSON, who was born in St. Alban's, Vermont, December 25, 1811, and by whom he had three children, two boys and one daughter: Nathan Henry, the eldest, born April 13, 1840, now resides at San Bernardino, California; Reuben Almon, born November 10, 1842, and resides at Meadville, Keya Paha County, Nebraska, (both have families and both served through the war of the Rebellion), and Marcia E., born in Hancock County, Illinois, July 26, 1845, to which county he had removed in the spring of 1844, and where his wife died September 8, 1846, and the infant died September 25, 1846.. He had purchased a forty-acre farm, and had begun to accumulate around him the comforts of life, when the destroying angel entered and desolation reigned supreme. This was indeed a day of adversity, and, to add to his afflictions, the horrors of a "Mormon War" seemed impending, mobs of infuriated men traversing the country threatening devastation and ruin! and to avoid the impending conflict he again removed to the adjoining county of Henderson, to remain until peace and order were restored, which was soon accomplished.. He then returned to his home in Hancock County, where he remained until he removed to Pottawattamie County, Iowa, in June, 1852. In the meantime he took a second wife, by the name of Almera W. JOHNSON, by whom he had three daughters. Her family were quite numerous and conspicuous in the Mormon church. In the spring of 1853 he bought a claim on section 30, township 76, range 43, and subsequently entered the southwest one-fourth thereof, and afterward added eighty acres of the same section. The only improvement on the land was a small log cabin, in which he made his home until 1857, when by dint of hard work and strict economy he succeeded in erecting a comfortable frame house and other necessary out-buildings; large and spacious barns were added from time to time.. About this time and three years subsequently a warning proclamation for the scattered remnants of saints to flee to the mountains, to the only place of safety on this continent from the devastations of impending war, was issued by Brigham Young, and there was a general departure of the faithful from this part of the country, and especially of the JOHNSON family; and to go and leave one behind was not to be thought of. Hence an influence was brought to bear upon Mrs. BARTON, which culminated in her going with the rest in the summer of 1861. Thus in the forty-ninth year of his age, and twenty-third of his married life, he was the second time bereft of wife; and this time, what was dearer than wife; three girls died, the eldest eleven years, and the youngest five years and six months; the youngest died December 20, 1861, and the eldest died March 23, 1870.. The Mother and only one daughter (feeble-minded) still live at Parowan, Utah.. At this time (1861) the war of the Rebellion had become notorious, and Mr. BARTON's eldest son, being of age, enlisted in Company B, Fourth Iowa Infantry. His other son, not yet twenty, received his permission, and enlisted in Company A, Twenty-ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry; thus leaving Mr. BARTON alone on the farm, a sort of recluse, to "hold the fort," and "ponder upon the vicisitudes of human life." At the close of the war the sons returned without the mark of a Rebel bullet, but impaired in health.. In the fall of 1867 our subject made a visit to Ohio, and October 20, 1867, was married the third time, this time to Maria J. CAROTHERS, the youngest of a large family, her birthplace being Phelps, Ontario County, New York, and born October 19, 1818. Her parents, John and Betsey (SICKLER) CAROTHERS, were born in 1774 and 1778 respectively. The father's death occurred February 17, 1842, and the mother's September 8, 1853, in Burton Ohio.. Mr. BURTON is a firm believer in the Spiritual philosophy, and his wife of the Christian Church. He is a life-long Republican, and was at one time the only one who cast a Republican vote in his precinct. Although his party was generally in the minority, he was often elected Justice of the Peace, and served as such for many years, and until he positively refused to accept any longer. Schools received his early attention, and he was mainly instrumental in getting the first school district organized in his precinct, and drew the first public funds, and as member of the board did all he could to promote the best interests of the community by establishing schools. He was commissioned a Notary Public in 1886, and is serving his second term, which expires in 1892.. In June, 1884, having arrived at an age when he could not attend properly to the care and labors of a farm, and on account of the feeble state of his wife's health, he was induced to sell the farm, which was well supplied with choice fruits, containing over 300 bearing trees. This arrangement was carried out, and he removed to Weston, his present residence, where he owns one acre of land and a comfortable dwelling, with the purpose of spending the remnant of his days in retirement. Having commenced life with nothing but good health and a determination to achieve a competence for himself and family, he feels that his efforts have not been in vain. He has been a pioneer in three different States, Iowa being the last, where he has lived thirty-eight years and witnessed magnificent improvements.. But this brief narrative of a long and eventful life would be incomplete and unsatisfactory without the following biographical sketch, written by himself; although it necessitates a little repetition, the cause of which occurred subsequent to the writing of the foregoing, and published in the Council Bluffs Nonpareil, September 24, 1890;. Mrs. Maria Jane BARTON, consort of Reuben BARTON, departed this life, September 10, 1890. She was born in Phelps Town, Ontario County, New York, October 19, 1818 and was the youngest of the numerous family of John and Betsy CAROTHERS. Her father removed to Burton, Geauga County, Ohio, in 1832, where he died February 17-18, 1842. She being the only unmarried one of the family, the care of her father during a lingering sickness fell upon her. After his death the care of an invalid mother, who had become blind and helpless, devolved upon her until her death, September 18, 1853, leaving our subject at the age of thirty-five, with feeble health and quite limited means. By overwork in lifting her mother through a series of years, she had contracted a disease of the spine, from which she was a great sufferer. She was under medical treatment by eminent physicians for eleven years, when she was so much improved as to enter the marriage relation with Reuben BARTON in the fall of 1867, and came with him to this county, where she resided until her death. She was a great sufferer from sickness. The change of climate improved her, but did not restore her to sound health. In 1884 the removal to Weston for a time seemed to be beneficial; but in September, 1887, she had a stroke of paralysis of the left side, from which she never recovered, although able to be about the house until the last fatal attack, which occurred August 9, 1890; she was then forced to bed, from which she never arose again. She survived, in great agony, a month, ceasing to breathe September 10, when she passed peacefully away, and there passed from earth life one of nature's noble women. Her sympathetic impulses knew no bounds; where duty seemed to call she was always ready, and to a sense of duty she sacrificed her health and life. They laid her tenderly to rest September 11, 1890.. Contributed by: Mona Sarratt Knight. misraelsen1 misraelsen1 originally shared this to Barton/Riding Ancestors 20 Sep 2008 ☒story

Maria Jane Carothers Barton, Carothers family link to the Prophet Joseph Smith

Birth: Oct. 19, 1818 Phelps Ontario County New York, USA Death: Sep. 10, 1890 Weston Pottawattamie County Iowa, USA Mrs. Maria Jane Barton, consort of Reuben Barton, departed this life, September 10, 1890. She was born in Phelps Town, Ontario Co, NY, Oct 19, 1818, and was the youngest of the numerous family of John and Betsy Carothers. Her father removed to Burton, Geauga Co, Ohio, in 1832, where he died Feb 17-18, 1842. She being the only unmarried one of the family, the care of her father during a lingering sickness fell upon her. After his death, the care of an invalid mother who had become blind and helpless, devolved upon Maria until her mother's death, Sept 18, 1853, leaving Maria, at age 35, with feeble health and quite limited means. By overwork in lifting her mother through a series of years, she had contracted a disease of the spine, from which she was a great suferer. She was under medical treatment by eminent physicians for 11 years, when she was so much improved as to enter the marriage relation with Reuben Barton in the fall of 1867, and came with him to this county where she resided until her death. She was a great sufferer from sickness. The change of climate improved her, but did not restore her to sound health. In 1884 the removal to Weston for a time seemed to be beneficial; but in Sept 1887, she had a stroke of paralysis of the left side, from which she never recovered, although able to be about the house until the last fatal attack, which occurred August 9, 1890; she was then forced to bed, from which she never arose again. She survived in great agony a month, ceasing to breathe Sept 10, when she passed peacefully away, and there passed from earth life one of nature's noble women. Her sympathetic impulses knew no bounds; where duty seemed to call she was always ready, and to a sense of duty she sacrificed her health and life. They laid her tenderly to rest Sept 11, 1890. .

Myrtle Ely

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Dad and his brothers

Dad and his brothers

Grandma Carrie Ely

Grandma Carrie Ely
lived to be 94 years old

Jeanetta Koons and sister Margaret

Jeanetta Koons and sister Margaret

Lana, Amber and Brandon Jenkins

Lana, Amber and Brandon Jenkins

"Bethie and Kevin"

"Bethie and Kevin"

Redone for "Bridges of Madison County"

Redone for "Bridges of Madison County"

Madison County Courthouse

Madison County Courthouse

Clarks Tower, Winterset, Iowa

Clarks Tower, Winterset, Iowa
In honor of Caleb Clark

Winterset, Iowa

Winterset, Iowa
"The Bridges of Madison County"

Spencer, Iowa

Spencer, Iowa
Home of some of the Callery's

Brownsville, Jefferson co, New York

Brownsville, Jefferson co, New York
Main street, 1909

Forefathers

Forefathers
An old Quaker Cemetery

Madison county, Iowa

Madison county, Iowa

Our Family Homes--Then and Now

Our Homes, some were lived in for generation, some for just a short time.

Musgrove and Abi Brown Evans Home

Musgrove and Abi Brown Evans Home
Musgrove Evans home

Musgrove Evans

Musgrove Evans

The Ely Home est. 1880

The Ely Home est. 1880
919 Second St., Webster City, Iowa

Home of Jacob J. and Pamela Brown

Home of Jacob J. and Pamela Brown
Brownsville, Jefferson co, NY

Home of Pheobe Walton and Caleb Ball

Home of Pheobe Walton and Caleb Ball
, , PA

Villages, Towns and Cities of my family.

Some of the homes and places my family and extended family have lived.

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I am a very busy grandma and mom to a passel of kids! I love crafts and enjoy sharing with others. I am involved in several groups that have shared interests. I have been involved with lots of home make-overs and enjoy decorating for myself and friends.

Sword of the Border

Sword of the Border
Book on the life of Jacob Jennings Brown

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